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Better Call Saul - Waterworks - Review

Kim is not dead! But she has a fate worse than death in 'Waterworks' that was written and directed by the one and only Vince Gilligan. We saw a post-Breaking Bad Kim Wexler. She lives on the east coast of Florida, working for a water sprinkler system company. But Kim is not the same Kim Wexler we know and love. She has a new hair color, is dating a 'Florida-man,' and can not make a decision of her own. Kim can not even choose between vanilla or strawberry ice cream. It's beyond sad to see Kim living such a depressing life. 

 Since the first episode of 'Better Call Saul,' the audience has been wondering what will happen to our beloved Kim Wexler. Throughout the series run, theories have been from Kim living happily with Jimmy/Saul out of the limelight and the puppet behind Saul Goodman's craziness. Down to the depressing theory that Kim had died in the hands of the cartel. But no one prepared us for the shell of the person Kim turned into during the pos-Breaking Bad era. It had seemed that the Kim that we love was completely gone. She showed no signs of her life before Florida until she got a call from Viktor Saint Clair. The name that Jimmy used with Kim when they were scamming people. So when Kim was told Viktor Saint Clair was on the phone, she knew who was waiting on the other line, Jimmy. Shocked to hear the voice of her ex-husband, Kim wonders after all this time Jimmy called her. Jimmy figured Kim would be happy to hear from him after six long years since she asked about Jimmy during her phone conversation with Francesca. The only thing that came out of Kim's mouth was to tell Jimmy to "turn himself in" and that "she was happy he was alive," which explains why Jimmy got so upset after the phone conversation on the other end. 

When Kim hung up the phone, she returned to her sad life and decided to take her own advice. Kim returned to Albuquerque to tell the District attorney about her involvement in Howard's death. Kim told the whole story, including how she and Jimmy made it look like Howard had a cocaine addiction for their gain. When Kim left the courthouse, she had to tell one more person about her involvement, Howard's widow. Kim showed Cheryl her statement. Up until now, Cheryl thought Howard had committed suicide. So for her to read Kim's statement that Lalo Salamanca murdered Howard, the pain of losing her husband came back.

 It's as if Kim came to Albuquerque to amend her sins. She has been living with the guilt of seeing Howard get shot in the head right in front of her in her and Jimmy's apartment. Howard would not have been there if it wasn't for their scam. In Kim's eyes, she is responsible for this murder and should be punished for it. But unfortunately, the physical evidence is not there, and everyone who can back her up is either dead or on the run. So Kim told Cheryl that it was highly unlikely that she would be prosecuted. 

 On her way back to Florida, Kim felt a sense of relief; she has been holding all this in for years. And suddenly, while Kim was on the car rental bus, a wave of emotion was released, giving the audience a profound performance by Rhea Seehorn. 

 'Waterworks' was split into two different storylines. The first half told Kim's story and the second pick-up where we left off with Gene when he broke the cancer man's window. That phone call with Kim got to him because Gene has been living on the edge of life since then. It seems as if he no longer cares if he gets caught. While Gene was walking around the cancer man's house, he seemed to enjoy himself, not just getting the man's banking information but Gene even going upstairs to check out the man's items. It was all fun and games until Gene noticed that the man was no longer asleep. Gene took an urn that belonged to the man's dog. Gene was going to bash the man in the head to escape. But luckily, the man fell back asleep, which saved his life. 

 While Gene was escaping the home of the cancer man, Jeff, the cab driver, was outside waiting for Gene when a cop car pulled up behind him. Jeff was shaking in his boots; he was so scared that he would get caught, but it turned out that the cops were sitting there to eat their dinner. But Jeff did not know that; he crashed his cab into a parked car which got him arrested. For Jeff's one phone call, he called Gene, pretending to be his son. Gene told him not to worry and that he would call Jeff's mother, Marion (Guest star Carol Bennett), to bail him out. Marion was upset to hear that her son was in jail. But Gene mentioned that Omaha was unlike Albuquerque; all she needed was cash to bail Jeff out. Something clicked in Marion's head; why would Gene know such a thing? So she googled "con-man Albuquerque," and Saul Goodman popped up; suddenly, Marion realized that Gene was Saul Goodman, and he was a wanted fugitive. When Gene walked into the home, he noticed that something was wrong. Marion stared at her laptop, then turned it around and pressed play. She had Saul Goodman's commercial playing. Gene knew he was caught, but he wouldn't let that happen. Gene pulled the phone cord out of the wall and started to wrap the cord around his hands as if Gene was going to strangle Marion right there in the kitchen. When Marion said, " I trusted you," kicked that soft spot Gene had for the old folks and took off. 

 'Waterworks' illustrated what the Breaking Bad universe does best, making characters face the consequence of their actions. Jimmy and Kim must face the damage they have done for the years of scamming, including the murder of Howard Hamlin. It seemed Kim had been punishing herself by creating a life of emptiness. Jimmy, however, has yet to learn from his actions. It seems as though whenever something bad happens to Jimmy, he becomes numb. Maybe in 'Saul Gone,' Jimmy will finally expect the consequences of his actions.

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