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Star Trek: Discovery - Details on Bryan Fuller's Exit; Originally Envisioned as an Anthology



I thought these were interesting articles to share, I've only shared a few details here, so please read the longer, detailed interviews on EW.



The Hannibal and Pushing Daisies showrunner initially wasn’t envisioning a single Trek series, but multiple serialized anthology shows that would begin with Star Trek: Discovery (a prequel to Star Trek: The Original Series), journey through the eras of Captain James T. Kirk and Captain Jean Luc Picard and then go beyond to a time in Trekthat’s never been seen before.

“The original pitch was to do for science-fiction what American Horror Story had done for horror,” Fuller says. “It would platform a universe of Star Trek shows.”

CBS countered with the plan of creating a single serialized series and then seeing how it performed. Still, the project was a dream come true for Fuller, who worked on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Voyager and long publicly lobbied for a return of the franchise to television — specifically with a woman of color at the helm.

Yet after starting work on the show, Fuller’s relationship with CBS became strained. He objected to the network’s choice of David Semel, a veteran of procedurals like Madam Secretary and Code Black, to direct the Discovery pilot (Baby Driver director Edgar Wright tells us he was among those Fuller approached instead).

Star Trek: Discovery is boldly going where no series in the franchise has gone before — onto a streaming service beyond the prudish content restrictions of broadcast and syndication. Showrunners Aaron Harberts and Gretchen J. Berg say the CBS All Access series will go a bit further than their Star Trek forebears when it comes to showing grown-up content but says they still plan to keep the show family friendly.

Nudity and Trek are indeed a potentially perilous combo. Previously, director J.J. Abrams received some flack for a brief shot in Star Trek: Into Darkness showing Alice Eve (who played Dr. Carol Marcus) in her underwear.

Still, there will be more edginess on Discovery than on, say, The Next Generation. “I’m not saying we’re not doing some violent things or doing a tiny bit of language,” Harberts said. “But what’s important to the creative team is the legacy of the show — which is passed down from mother to daughter, from father to son, from brother to brother. We want to make sure we’re not creating a show that fans can’t share with their families. You have to honor what the franchise is. I would say we’re not going much beyond hard PG-13.”

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